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  1. #1
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    Default Page Size vs. Page Resolution

    I'm confused about the difference between page size as measured in pixels and page resolution as measured in dpi. I understand the measurement/size of a page. What I don't understand is resolution of that page. Is there a guideline for resolution size when uploading scrapbook pages for printing (e.g. 9x11 book)? Should most photos be about 300 dpi for about a 4x6" size? Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Whenever you start a new page, you should select the size you want (in inches) and enter 300 for your resolution. 300 is recommended for printing. 72 is for web quality.

    I personally don't pay attention to page size as measured by pixels anymore. But if you had a 12x12, with 300 dpi, it would work out to 3,600 x3,600 pixels. (My brain hurts, if I have to think and calculate. Just easier to remember it needs to be set at 300) I have all of my new page presets for all sizes set up with 300.
    Last edited by dmrdm; 01-13-2016 at 05:08 AM.
    Doris
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  3. #3
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    Thank you...and photo dpi should be what?

  4. #4
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    DPI vs PPI is always tough to get the brain around, isn't it.

    So DPI has to do with the *printer* - dots per inch. That the number of dots of ink the printer sprays in an inch.

    In PS and PSE you just set PPI. We usually recommend 300 PPI. That will print just fine on any printer. I've seen some recommendations that you can go as low as 240 PPI and still get a good picture, and many times, with today's advanced printers, you can. But, just to be safe, do 300 PPI. So, your pictures, your background, your elements - should all be 300 PPI.

    In PS and PSE you cannot set the DPI, only the PPI. The driver for your printer (or if you send your pages to someplace, their printer) has some conversion routine to convert the PPI of your image to DPI so it will look nice.

    If you are having your pictures printed somewhere, you can ask them what the minimum PPI is they accept for a good print. I always set mine at 300 PPI.

    Hope this helps.
    -Trish, Forum Director

    PSE 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and CS5, CS6, CC201717 on Windows 10; CC and PSE 13, 15 on Mac; IMatch for Organizing Photos on Windows
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  5. #5
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    The explanation about DPI and PPI (pixels per inch?) was very helpful, Trish. Still, one can't place a 72 dpi photo into a 300 PPI and expect that photo to print at a good resolution, can one? The photo itself must still have a reasonable amount of dpi, doesn't it? Thank you for your response!

  6. #6
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    Axelant,

    Right, so your image must have a reasonable PPI to get a decent print. Here is some of the math involved:

    There are two factors involved. Lets say you have a 72 PPI photo. You open it in photoshop elements and check the image size, and it says 72PPI, 12 inches width, 8 inches height (just making up some numbers). Well, 72 x 12 is 864 pixels, and 72 x 8 is 576 pixels. So, if you changed that to 300 PPI, then you'd have 2 inches (and some left over), and 1 inch and some left over. So, you'd have to print it very small to get a good picture.

    But, say that your image says it is 72 PPI, but when you check the inches, it says it is 25 inches wide. Aha! Now you have 72 x 25 is 1800 pixels. You divide that by 300, and you get 6 inches. At that width, a 4 x 6 picture at 72 pixels wide will be 16.67 inches high. That would be enough to give you a good print.

    If you create a document that is 4x6 at 300 PPI, and then drag a photo over to it, PSE will automatically adjust the picture to be a 300 PPI picture. So, if it doesn't have enough pixels, like in my first paragraph, it will show up very small in that 300 PPI document. However, if it does have enough, it will either fit, or be larger.

    Some cameras will set the PPI at 72. But, if it is a 6 or 10 or 12 megapixel camera, you have enough pixels for a good image.

    Really PPI is used to tell your monitor how to display the image. Your monitor uses pixels. So that number tells your monitor, "Hey, use 72 pixels per inch to display this image." If you are downloading pictures off of websites or facebook, and those photos say 72 PPI, they are probably too small to print as 4x6 images. You would probably need to print those as 1.5 x 2.75 inch photos to get decent results.
    -Trish, Forum Director

    PSE 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and CS5, CS6, CC201717 on Windows 10; CC and PSE 13, 15 on Mac; IMatch for Organizing Photos on Windows
    Nikon D50 (dSLR), Nikon 560 (point and shoot), iPhone 6
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  7. #7
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    Hi Trish, I'm slowly beginning to comprehend. I really appreciate your taking the time to answer my question with great detail and explanation. I also reviewed the session on Resolution in the Learn Digital Scrapbooking class by Linda.

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